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Dec 05

The Entrenched vs. the Newcomers

  • The Entrenched vs. the Newcomers
Toronto ON, 67 Yonge Street, Suite 300

2019 Scholars' Dinner with Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

The proliferation of unfair laws and regulations is walling off opportunity in North America’s greatest cities. In this year’s Annual Scholars’ Dinner, Professor Edward Glaeser will address the conflict between entrenched interests and newcomers in its economic, political, geographic, and generational dimensions. The question for policymakers is whether they enhance the gains that flourish from the proximity and openness that cities offer, or double-down on the advantages secured by exclusion and anti-competitive behavior.

The C.D. Howe Institute would like to invite you to join us for our Annual Scholars’ Dinner featuring Edward Glaeser, the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics at Harvard University. The Institute’s Annual Scholars’ Dinner is held to recognize the significant accomplishments of it’s fellows and contributors.

Members: $125| Non-members: $200 | Table of 6: $1,000

The C.D. Howe Institute's Scholars' Dinner has been made possible through a generous grant from Dr. Wendy Dobson, Professor at the Rotman School of Management and Co-Director of the Rotman Institute for International Business.

Please contact Tammy Trepanier, Event Planner, to register: ttrepanier@cdhowe.org.

Edward Glaeser, Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Edward Glaeser is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, where he has taught since 1992. He regularly teaches microeconomics theory, and occasionally urban and public economics. He has served as Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and Director of the Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston. He has published dozens of papers on cities economic growth, law, and economics. In particular, his work has focused on the determinants of city growth and the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago in 1992. His books include Cities, Agglomeration, and Spatial Equilibrium (Oxford University Press, 2008), Rethinking Federal Housing Policy (American Enterprise Institute Press, 2008), and Triumph of the City (Penguin Press, 2011).

Thursday, December 5, 2019 - 17:30 to 20:30
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C.D. Howe Institute events are open to members and their guests. Members can register by contacting events@cdhowe.org.