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September 24, 2014

A proposal by the Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to mandate “pick-and-pay” television offerings for Canadians is deeply misguided, according to a report from the C.D. Howe Institute. In “Let the Market Decide: The Case Against Mandatory Pick-and-Pay,” authors Lawson Hunter, Edward Iacobucci and Michael Trebilcock find that mandating consumers to be able to subscribe to pay and specialty services on a service-by-service basis  would be a slippery slope to still more regulation, and would become irrelevant at best in the ongoing telecom revolution.

 

 

Edward M. Iacobucci
Edward Iacobucci, Dean and Professor of Law, University of Toronto Faculty Of Law, Fellows-in-Residence

Competition Policy Scholar, C.D. Howe Institute​

Edward M. Iacobucci is Osler Chair in Business Law and Professor of Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, and Associate Dean, Research.

Lawson A.W. Hunter, Q.C. LL.D.
Lawson Hunter, Former Commissioner of the Competition Bureau, Canada; Counsel, Stikeman Elliott LLP, Senior Fellows

Formerly Canada’s senior civil servant in charge of competition policy and enforcement, Mr. Hunter was primarily responsible for the drafting of the federal Competition Act. From 1993 to 2003, he was a partner of Stikeman Elliott and head of the firm’s Competition and Foreign Investment Group.

Michael Trebilcock
Michael Trebilcock, Director, Law and Economics Programme, University of Toronto, Research Fellows

Michael J. Trebilcock graduated from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand in 1962 with an LL.B. and completed his LL.M. at the University of Adelaide in 1965.  He joined the Faculty of Law at the University of Toronto in 1972.