From: Alexandre Laurin

To: Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland

Date: October 14, 2021

Re: Tracking Capital Gains: Not Just for the Rich

Government deficits, along with distributional concerns, have fueled calls for heavier taxation of capital gains in recent years. Yesterday, we examined modelling around taxpayer responses to any increases.

From: Åke Blomqvist and Paul Grootendorst

To: Canadians Concerned about Drug Prices

Date: October 12, 2021

Re: Price Regulation Not the Best Answer for Pharmaceuticals

Big changes are afoot in the way patent drugs are priced in Canada. At present, Canada’s Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB), a federal agency, is responsible for setting maximum prices for patented drugs (i.e., pharmaceuticals, biologics and vaccines).

To: Canadians concerned about healthcare

From: Janice MacKinnon

Date: October 6, 2021

Re: Saskatchewan Model Shows How Private Clinics Can Play in a Public System

From: Martin Eichenbaum

To: Canadian deficit watchers

Date: October 1, 2021

Re: Meet r Minus g: A New Way to Worry about Deficit Spending

Should Canadians worry about the level of government debt when interest rates are so low?

Yes. But the primary danger doesn’t come so much from Canada. Instead, it comes from the fiscal behavior of the US government.

Canada should negotiate a fairer share of drug R&D costs – Financial Post Op-Ed

Big changes are afoot in the way patent drugs are priced in Canada. At present, Canada’s Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB), a federal agency, is responsible for setting maximum prices for patented drugs (i.e., pharmaceuticals, biologics and vaccines). The agency has been criticized for failing to rein in prices, which are higher than in some peer countries. This criticism is unfair: the tools the PMPRB was given to regulate drug prices when it was established in 1987 have become less effective over time.

From: William B.P. Robson

To: Canadian voters

Date: September 21, 2021

Re: The Election’s Over and Canada’s Spending Bill is Coming Due

Former Prime Minister Kim Campbell got pilloried in 1993 for saying an election is no time to discuss serious issues. Yet in September 2021, her words ring true.

How Will Canadians Feel About Today’s Campaign Promises When the Bill Comes Due? – Globe and Mail Op-Ed

Former Prime Minister Kim Campbell got pilloried in 1993 for saying an election is no time to discuss serious issues. Yet in September 2021, her words ring true. Foreign policy? We all but ignore the rest of the world. Monetary policy? Not something to think about, even with inflation above 4 per cent. Fiscal policy? Almost no one is talking about whether, over time, we will be willing and able to finance all the goodies being added to the federal budget.

From: Aurelien Portuese

To: Canadians Concerned About Competition

Date: September 17, 2021

Re: Principles of Dynamic Antitrust